Press Clip Source: METTA Center for Nonviolence 
Date: November 17, 2015
Written by: Soneile Hymn
Read original article: Here

DerekpodcastDerek Oakley of Nonviolent Peaceforce for joins us for this episode on Peace Paradigm Radio to tell his story of nonviolent resistance in the face of armed men in the middle of the civil war going on in South Sudan. We go into specifics on the training, the situation and the nonviolent principles that led to this triumph for nonviolence. Then, on Nonviolence in the News, Michael touches on a variety of topics including great new nonviolence resources, and recent actions for peace education, humanization and other aspects of nonviolence and its praxis.

The image is Derek Oakley and fellow peacekeeper Andes Gutierrez after successfully employing the power of nonviolence.

Play the show in a new window, or see the full article here.

 

Press Clip Source: Luwaran.com
Date: November 17, 2015
Written by: A'shadieeyah Faizeen
Read original article: Here

Buluan, Maguindanao – Despite the uncertainty of Bangsamoro Basic Law (BBL) being passed by congress, Maguindanao political leaders gathered in a peace dialogue on November 10, 2015 at BBGM Restaurant, Buluan, Maguindanao where they issued a manifesto calling for the passage of a BBL that faithfully complies with the Comprehensive Agreement on the Bangsamoro (CAB) and not the one that will reduce the powers and authority of the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM).

“We are all living witnesses to how our people – men, women, children and the elderly – lost lives and properties, experienced disruption of economic activities and suffered indignity in the evacuation centers brought about by the conflict in Mindanao”, the leaders said in their manifesto.

“We strongly believe that the BBL submitted by the Office of the President (OP) to the Lower House and the Senate on September 10 last year, can address various forms of injustices committed against the Bangsamoro and, thus, can bring forth dignified peace, meaningful development, unity and reconciliation in the entire country,” they said in their statement.

The peace dialogue was participated by local government units from the provincial level to the municipal level.

Prof. Miriam Coronel-Ferrer, Chair of the Government of the Philippines (GPH) Peace Panel, representatives from the Bangsamoro Transition Commission (BTC), and Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF) were invited to the said dialogue.

Read more: Maguindanao political leaders call for passage of cab-compliant bbl for national unity and...

Press Clip Source: Radio Tamazuj
Date: November 2, 2015
Written by: Martin Odhiambo
Read original article: Here

The author, who works as a Family Tracing and Reunification Specialist for Save the Children South Sudan, describes his involvement in the recent reunion of 14 children from Bor with their families in Akobo.

On 30th October, Channel 4, a UK-based television channel aired a documentary called ‘Frontline Family Reunions’ under its acclaimed ‘Unreported World’ series. I participated in the making of the documentary, and I simply can’t resist the urge to share the emotional roller-coaster of this exhilarating journey with people who don’t live in the United Kingdom, and may have missed the opportunity to watch the touching documentary.

Let me start with a little bit of context. ‘Family Tracing and Reunification’ (FTR) is a child protection programme funded by UNICEF, UNHCR, Dutch Joint Humanitarian Response, and it is implemented by partners with Save the Children as the lead agency. It is designed to help reunify South Sudanese children who were separated from their families at the height of the war. The producers of Channel 4’s ‘Unreported World’ series picked interest in Save the Children’s FTR work, and they decided to send a television crew to come and join us on this particular reunification journey.

This was a journey with a difference – a journey from foster care in a UN Protection of Civilians (PoC) camp in Bor town, to family warmth in Akobo County in South Sudan’s Jonglei state. It started on Monday, 7th September, and it involved 14 children aged between 2–12 years who had been separated from their parents during the chaos and turmoil of war that engulfed South Sudan in December 2013.

Read more: Opinion: War children’s journey from UN camp to family warmth

Press Clip Source: The Star Online 
Date: November 1, 2015
Written by: Dariusz Dziewanski
Read original article: Here

thestaronlineA WIDE, infectious smile spreads across Rocky George Ambago’s face when he talks about his work. Through his role with the Nonviolent Peaceforce (NP) in South Sudan, Ambago helps to champion an innovative model of peacekeeping called unarmed civilian protection (UCP). The non-profit organisation trains civilians to play a role similar to that of peacekeepers.

Ambago is committed to bringing peace to his native country. Before joining the NP, he spent almost 10 years fleeing conflict in his homeland. After long periods of exile in the Central African Republic, Democratic of Congo, and Uganda, he was offered resettlement in Canada but refused to leave.

“What am I going to do outside, when my country needs me?” he explains. Instead, he returned to South Sudan.

Ambago and his team work to save lives largely by monitoring warring groups and using their presence to exert social pressure so that would-be perpetrators of violence are more likely to act peacefully. NP-trained personnel also act as protective escorts for individuals – for instance, the displaced or those seeking medical attention – who might be threatened by violence.

Read more: Here’s a novel idea: Peace without weapons

Press Clip Source: Gurtong.net 
Date: November 1, 2015
Written by: Mabor Riak Magok
Read original article: Here

The Nonviolent Peaceforce South Sudan a non-profit organisation last week trained 50 women on peace keeping in Rumbek Lakes State.

RUMBEK, 30 October 2015 [Gurtong] - The organisation brought together participants from affected communities of Rumbek Centre and Rumbek East Counties.

Addressing the participants during the workshop the Minister of Local Government and Law Enforcement Agency, Samuel Will Machiek urged the women in Pandor to refrains from instigating and inciting violence in their respective communities, saying that the community is losing potential youth for no good reason.

He urged the women to embrace and adopt a culture of peace dialogue or discussion starting from the family level between their husbands and children at home and extend this spirit up to the group level in the Payams and villages where revenge killings and cattle raiding is imminently experienced.

Read more: 50 Women Trained On Peace Keeping Skills In Rumbek

Press Clip Source: The Guardian 
Date: October 30, 2015
Written by: Dariusz Dziewanski
Read original article: Here

 

An innovative model of peacekeeping called unarmed civilian protection is transforming communities blighted by war.

A wide, infectious smile spreads across Rocky George Ambago’s face when he talks about his work. Through his role with the Nonviolent Peaceforce (NP) in South Sudan Rocky helps to champion an innovative model of peacekeeping called unarmed civilian protection (UCP). The non-profit organisation trains civilians to play a role similar to that of peacekeepers.

Rocky is committed to bringing peace to his native country. Before joining the NP he spent almost 10 years fleeing conflict in his homeland. After long periods of exile in the Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of Congo and Uganda, he was offered resettlement in Canada but refused to leave. “What am I going to do outside, when my country needs me?” he explains. Instead, he returned to South Sudan.

Rocky and his team work to save lives largely by monitoring warring groups and using their presence to exert social pressure so that would-be perpetrators of violence are more likely to act peacefully. NP-trained personnel also act as protective escorts for individuals – for instance, the displaced or those seeking medical attention – who might be threatened by violence.

Rocky in a training session
Rocky trains cattle herders to increase their understanding and awareness of protection in their community. Photograph: Nonviolent Peaceforce South Sudan
Following decades of civil war with its northern neighbour, South Sudan, the world’s youngest country, is awash with guns. The fledgling nation has been plagued by internal conflict since its birth and has a history of internal ethnic tensions. Although no official death toll has been kept, it is estimated that tens of thousands have died and 2.2 million have been displaced.

Read more: The unarmed civilians bringing peace to South Sudan

Press Clip Source: Midland Daily News 
Date: October 27,2015
Written by: Ralph E. Wirtz
Read original article: Here

Suppose for a moment that your mere presence in a room or a field or at a campground could save a life, stop a rape or prevent an abduction.

The globe-trotting Mel Duncan was at Delta College Monday night, telling those in attendance that this supposition is true, and that there are people in more than 50 organizations from 35 nations around the world doing those things, protecting civilians just by being in areas where violence is occurring. Unarmed Civilian Protection is a new phenomenom, a one-generation method of responding to violence, he said.

Duncan is co-founder of Nonviolent Peaceforce, one of those 50 organizations, and he offered proof that the idea is working. He said the primary work of his organization is to “protect civilians from imminent violence.” Teams of unarmed, trained professionals respond in areas where they are wanted. They are nonpartisan and nonviolent and they “live and work in the communities where conflict is,” Duncan said.

“While we are there, our specific and only job is the protection of civilians, to work with local civilian society to deter violence and to help strengthen the peace infrastructures,” he said.

The need for finding ways to resolve conflicts peacefully is growing, Duncan said, citing a report from the United Nations Panel on Global Climate Change that stated “the worst is yet to come.” Duncan said climate disruption exacerbates violent conflict.

“Today, more people are affected by conflict and disaster more frequently and for longer periods than in previous decades and that number in need of humanitarian assistance and protection has nearly doubled in the past decade,” Duncan said. “We now have 60 million of us who are in direct need of shelter and refuge because of violent conflict and persecution.”

One example he cited was NP’s work in South Sudan. There, in the midst of civil war, more than 4 million people are displaced and many live in “protection of civilian areas.”

Read more: Duncan describes impact of Unarmed Civilian Protection